Sunday, February 19, 2012

Lucia Nogueira


MISCHIEF

sculptures and drawings by 

Lucia Nogueira

15 January - 13 March 2011
'Her work reveals, it does not explain', Adrian Searle
Before her death at the age of forty-eight, Lucia Nogueira had become one of the most individual voices in sculpture in this country. The artist Liam Gillick once described her as 'taking things that are close to hand and imbuing them with malignancy and magic.' Combining and adapting pieces of discarded furniture and other objects, her sculptures engage with the space in which they are set.
In the work 'Mischief' a wooden chair has lost its seat and one leg traps a white bridal train that turns out to be an unrolled strip of plastic carrier bags. 'No Time for Commas' has a tied-up bag scurrying endlessly around inside an upturned table top. We don't know what's in the bag nor in cupboards turned to the wall, nor why a cable disappears into a plan-chest. In one corner an empty cable wheel is immobilised by a steel pillar.
'My way of thinking is very much from Brazil: my way of picking up objects comes from there too. It is something connected with childhood and also with the Brazilian psyche. Our way of thinking is not as linear as it is in Europe ... In art you obviously have a background in art history that is very rich. We don't have that in Brazil at all ... We just do everything in a very empirical way, even art.'
Wit, mischief and enigma also pervade her drawings. Row upon row of buttons become a crowd of spectators. Watercolour blotches take on the character of objects which can't quite be identified except when one becomes an elephant on wheels.
This is the first exhibition in the UK to survey her ten-year career.
A catalogue with an essay by Ian Hunt accompanies the show.

in http://www.kettlesyard.co.uk/exhibitions/nogueira.html

Installation photos here
Download catalogue as pdf here

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'Smoke', Lucia Nogueira, 1996, 16mm film transferred to video

@ Tate Modern:
Lucia Nogueira (Room 9)
Lucia Nogueira's poetic installations and videos explore everyday experience and encourage imaginative contemplation.
Nogueira's work is intentionally open-ended and leaves questions unanswered. By inviting spectators to create meaning through their own memories and associations she allowed for new narrative possibilities.
Smoke is a video documenting an installation Nogueira produced in Berwick, a garrison town on the border between England and Scotland, divided from the sea by its immense Elizabethan ramparts. Nogueira worked in common grazing land between the town and the sea. Her installation comprised two small kiosks painted black, one of which dispensed black kites, the other black umbrellas. In addition she positioned a black bench where visitors could sit and look out to sea, a large black flag on a nearby golf course, and a black stepladder on a verge overlooking earthworks.
The video, shot in grainy black and white, shows the mysterious and lyrical elements which made up Nogueira's site-specific work. The long bench appears, first vacant and later occupied by pensioners. Nogueira encouraged visitors to use her kites and umbrellas and several scenes show the kites dancing in the wind, their shadows playing across the ramparts. A soundtrack of ambient noise - birdsong, the flapping of the kites and the flag, murmuring voices and the gentle hum of the wind - accompanies the images. The video functions as a record of the Berwick event and as a poetic work in its own right.
Lucia Nogueira (1950-1998) was born in Goiania, Brazil. She lived and worked in London from 1975.
Curated by Stuart Comer
Text by Stuart Comer and Rachel Taylor
in here

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"Smoke was filmed in Berwick-on-Tweed, an old garrison town on the Scottish/English border, divided from the sea by its immense Elizabethan ramparts. The film examines the barriers between sea and sky, sky and land, and the ramparts themselves. It returns constantly to static objects and views of the town, which contrast with a scene in which hundreds of black kites are flown from the top of the cliff, evoking a sense of the artist drawing in the sky. Smoke was made in collaboration with Maysoon Pachachi, Jon Sanders and Humphry Trevelyan."

in here

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Michael John Martin, who participated in the preparation and shooting of 'smoke':

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Gilly Pelham 'Little black kites' commisioned by Lucia for her 'Smoke' installation and exhibition 

(Michael John Martin): This photo was taken at my test flight of one of the kites a week prior to the filming taking place........ location is St Mary's Lighthouse North Tyneside.

We never got to see the finished film part of the installation. Regrettably Lucia passed from us a short time later, which came as a real shock. I have over the years been in touch with the main contributors who helped /accompanied Lucia with the project on the day to perhaps get to see a copy of the film. I know 'The Tate' have a copy, but i would have to make an appointment and travel to London to view it.
Lucia was a lovely, beautiful person, and in the brief, short time that our paths crossed, I am still amazed how 'Smoke' has, and still enters my thoughts on occasions. It was Lucia's intention that we would see the finished film! ......... I am sure it will happen! 
I still have the 'Little black kite' that Lucia 'signed' and gave me, along with the original brochure from the whole 'Ramparts' project. It is my intention to take a photo of the kite and brochure and upload them too!............ blessings and regards, MJM

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The day of the filming!............ of 'SMOKE'


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Article at 'Frieze' Issue 93, September 2005

Lucia Nogueira - 
THE DRAWING ROOM, LONDON, UK
The late Brazilian installation artist Lucia Nogueira had a taste for things that flew and floated. This show of drawings and watercolours, most of them done in London in the 1990s, features images of balloons, helicopters, ghosts and kites. In one piece neat white teeth hang from a horizontal red stripe against a dark backdrop, looking like clothes on a washing line. In another a helicopter hovers over a column of wispy yellow patches that seem to trace its rise. Elsewhere colourful faces float against the white of the paper, trailing lines of paint below them as released balloons trail lengths of twine. In Nogueira’s world gravity has little pull.
She had a light touch. Her drawings, with their gawky lines, thin washes and pared-down imagery, play themselves out in a minor key. They take pleasure in coincidences, in odd conjunctions and non sequiturs, but they often push their whimsy up against something darker. The floating objects are touched with lightness and humour, of course, but also at times with an understated menace. Their weightlessness is not a sign of ethereality but of a randomness that occasionally has dim undercurrents of pain and horror. It is a measure of Nogueira’s wit and judgement that you don’t immediately ask what those heads are doing without bodies, or those teeth without a mouth.
Many of the drawings show groupings of similar objects – a trio of televisions, a set of tables, an army of buttons. The items are removed from their context and left in a kind of semiotic limbo. But not all of them are ordinary household objects; Nogueira also had a liking for isolated body parts and prosthetic limbs. In one drawing lone feet protrude from long tubes. In another, Pinocchio’s wooden arms and legs are separated and laid out in rows and, in a clever play on the story, the red of his conical hat seeps out of its triangle, as if the dismantling were really a dismembering. This is one of several images in which runnels and stains of water-colour obliquely mimic the dripping and spreading of blood.
Nogueira was alert to the slipperiness of shapes and symbols. She knew how to make a plane look like a sea creature and a rabbit like a snail. In one piece she painted mathematical signs against a dark backdrop, labouring over their outlines as if the meaning of a plus sign were contingent on its painterly treatment – although the signs, which form a horizontal band, could also be read as a luminous fence in a nocturnal landscape. The drawings regularly treat the conventions of picture-making as seductively foreign. The laws of perspective are at times teasingly undermined, as in the drawing of a ladder against a black background. There is no telling whether the ladder tapers towards the top or just looks wider at the bottom because it is pictured from below. And, leading nowhere, it serves no obvious purpose.
The viewer is often left wondering what to make of pictorial gestures that look too significant to be entirely accidental but too anomalous to be deliberate. Three garden chairs appear in a row, but their seats are hidden behind large black forms that look faintly like patches of rot but more clearly like the ink blots that they are. A drop of enamel paint interrupts a dark expanse of watercolour, faintly resembling a figure in a landscape, though it could just be a slip of the brush. A large black rectangle which may or may not be a key ring hangs from a chain. These motifs – the ink blots, the drop of enamel, the hanging rectangle – are apparently abstract not by design but by default. The forms in Nogueira’s drawings often look as if they were somehow deflected from their initial and more confidently figurative intentions.
The artist was plainly drawn to the gratuitous. The drawings relay senseless pictorial events that are by turns threatening, puzzling and funny. Figures appear where they don’t belong, and once functional objects lie about uselessly or gather in mysterious assemblies. Things lose their weight and substance and hover before the viewer, slipping in and out of legibility. And if the gratuitous, as it surfaces in the drawings, occasionally has undertones of pain, it also provides a deeply pleasurable release from the drudgery of common sense and purpose. Nogueira’s world is shot through with a senselessness that manifests itself in a muffled violence one moment and a throwaway generosity the next – and occasionally in both at once.
Marcus Verhagen
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1989 wire mesh, organza, beans, 14 x 26 x 15cm photo courtesy Anthony Reynolds Gallery


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State of the Art | Lucia Nogueira -  January 14, 2011


In State of the Art, John-Paul Pryor converses with some of the art world’s most creative behind the scenes players: the curators
Born in 1950 in the town of Goiânia in central Brazil, Lucia Nogueira came to London in 1975, where, a decade later, she began practicing as a sculptor. Before she passed away in 1998, her idiosyncratic approach to the form and her ability to infuse discarded and found objects with powerfully expressive tension made her the toast of the art world — from gas pipes seemingly threatening to explode, to huge wheels that looked as though they might be about to roll across gallery spaces, she always managed to engage the viewer’s imagination in an unsettling conceptual game. This month, the artist is the subject of a major retrospective at Kettle’s Yard in Cambridge entitled Mischief. Here the curator of the show Elizabeth Fisher tells us why it’s something that’s long overdue.
In what sense are Nogueira's sculptures obscure objects of desire? Why do you think she was compelled to challenge the viewer to scrutinise her work for meaning?Before her death in 1998, Nogueira had become one of the most individual voices in sculpture in this country. She tapped into the emotional and psychological life of objects and her legacy was to demonstrate the ongoing expressive potential of sculpture. Liam Gillick once described her as "taking things that are close to hand and imbuing them with malignancy and magic", and many of the works explore sensations of tension — weight and vulnerability, arrested motion, visibility and obscurity — through combinations of materials such as fur and metal or the juxtaposition of objects like an empty industrial-size cable wheel held still by a steel post. Her work reveals affinities with a range of artists and movements, such as Arte Povera and minimalism, and female predecessors such as Eva Hesse, Lygia Clark and Louise Bourgeois. This is the first significant survey of her work since her death in 1998. It includes little known pieces as well as some more familiar works, and reveals some recurring themes and motifs. There are also a number of works on paper, which are somewhat freer and more whimsical than her sculptures.
Can you talk to us a little about how Nogueira plays with the viewer's perception and how (if at all) they are metaphors for human relationships and sexual desire?There are some early drawings where sexuality is explicitly referred to — a scene of a couple having sex on a mattress, or figures with their heads obscured by red or black clouds often connected with a thin black arrow pointing to the genitals. The connection was between the mind and sexuality. But I am less sure of sexuality being explicit in the sculptures, although they are vividly sensuous. I think there is violence or power implicit in some of the combinations of materials, but this is so obtuse, as with all of Nogueira's gestures, it's hard to identify a specific meaning. I think the fact that her works manifest a finely tuned ambivalence is more important.
Would you say that sexuality and feminism were key concerns for Nogueira?I think Nogueira did draw on her sexuality and gender in her practice, but these themes become so obtuse and coded that I wouldn't say it was a key concern. It is one of many readings of her work; her work has many different associations and resonances, it is intentionally difficult to pin down and enigmatic in nature.
Do you think there was sometimes an overtly political element to some of Nogueira's work? What do you think Nogueira's opinion would have been on the reduction of art to commodity?Nogueira's work does not reduce art to the discourse of commodities — I think she would have regarded that as a rather one-dimensional understanding of art. In the process of using discarded objects such as a wobbly chair or rickety wooden cabinets as the basis of many of her works, paired with painstakingly polished drinks cans (unopened) and off-the shelf plastic bin liners, Nogueira may have offered us a moment to reflect on cultures of mass consumption and production, but she wasn't being overtly political. What she really seems to revel in is their aesthetic and emotional value.

Mischief: Sculptures and drawings by Lucia Nogueira exhibits at Kettle's Yard, Cambridge from 15 January until 13 March.
John-Paul Pryor is Contributing Arts Editor at Dazed Digital and AnOther Magazine, and writes for Dazed & Confused, TANK, AnOther and The Quietus. His debut novel Spectacles is out now.

in  http://www.anothermag.com/current/view/750/Lucia_Nogueira

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Lucia Nogueira In conversation with William Furlong

from Audio Arts Volume 12, Number 1, 1992

Transcript

William Furlong: There are a number of pieces placed on the floor, and the one we’re looking at is a galvanised bucket with red fabric tubing coming out of it. Perhaps we could start by talking about this piece?
Lucia Nogueira: This piece is basically a pipe made of silk, filled up with sand. It is connected with previous work I’ve done with elements like tubes or holes. I did a tube running from a storage room and then coming through the gallery in a straight line and getting completely tangled up in a hessian sack; and then again a very determined straight line goes inside a bucket and then gets muddled up again and then at the end there is nothing there. It’s not filled, it’s just resting on that frame.
WF: The elements in the exhibition seem to have a sense of interior tension.
LN: It’s a tension in that you don’t know where it starts and where it ends. For instance, this silk pipe you don’t know what’s in it. It goes in that sack and the sack suggests a place where one keeps things. Then it goes inside a bag and the bag suggests something that carries liquid. It’s like a vicious circle; there is no beginning or end. And this applies to most of the pieces. For instance, this piece is an old box that I found, and a rubber pipe. It suggests that something’s inside that box. And the rubber pipe again is a kind of connection between the inside and the outside. It just hangs there very comfortably. And in a way all these elements are like the metal mercury that can go up and down; it’s like a mediator, and it’s always in my work, this kind of power that the mercury has, and the work looks like it’s not finished, in a way.
WF: You use mercury in another work…
LN: Yes, I did at the Chisenhale Gallery. I made an installation there with two man-sized gas pipes and then opposite a tiny little mercury switch. And the switch had the same kind of value as the gas pipes, in terms of power, of energy.
WF: You use elements of the real world.
LN: It’s things that I see on the street, things that I have in my studio… it accumulates in my head and when I start making the work, I actually don’t know what’s going on and I can’t digest it. And then after about a year I know more or less what that thing was about. But basically it’s impressions of things that I see on the streets all the time, like photograph shots, you know, in your head.
WF: Is the starting point the observation of things you come across, or are they thought about in a more cerebral way before you create the form?
LN: Both, in fact. But there comes a point within the development of the work that everything you thought about goes behind and the impressions come through and take over.
WF: Is this an installation where there’s a very strong interaction between the pieces when you install them?
LN: I couldn’t just finish in my studio and say, OK, I’ll do that in the gallery, because I had to consider the space. My work is never finished in the studio.
WF: You came from Brazil to England in 1975. Do you think your background enters this work?
LN: I’m sure the process of work is connected with my background. The way of thinking is very much from Brazil and also the way of choosing, the way of picking up objects… it’s something connected with childhood. Brazil is not linear like a European country. You have a linear thought. In art, you have a very rich background of art history, and we don’t have that in Brazil, not of visual arts. I think the way we developed our visual sense is different from the Europeans because we were not taught at schools about art like you are here. You do everything in a very empirical way, even art.
WF: A lot of Western contemporary art has a stylistic unity, whereas the work here has a stylistic disunity. But there is a conceptual unity to do with the combination of opposites.
LN: Because we didn’t have schools, the contemporary Brazilian artists somehow invented something.
WF: How do you feel your work relates to this European context?
LN: My work has a mood of being from another place. Most of my work is about urban lives. It’s very much the sense of those things that you find on streets, which are expressions of people's behaviour and thoughts. It’s very much from London, actually, this work, but because I’m from Brazil, the mood’s different. Some people think that there is a kind ritual about my work. Maybe there is, but I never thought of ritual when actually making it.
WF: Is it important to you that it does have a correspondence with your everyday?
LN: I think if you are making art, everything one does is a bit dictated by what you find around you… things that somehow connect with what you are, those things you’ve read. It’s a melting pot, and in the end it comes out something else. It’s a kind of obsession with visual elements you find. I think the best part of making art is encountering those very mundane and silly things that you find around, no?
WF: I raise the issue of a discourse arising out of the fact that you’re Brazilian: is there any parallel discourse to do with you being a woman?
LN: Good question. I honestly don’t know. Some people say that my work is very much a woman's work. But I don’t think it really matters in the end, you know. I think what matters is the work.
WF: I wonder whether there is some sort of autobiographical experience coming through the work?
LN: I sometimes think that my work is all about gaps. You have a linear routine in your life that carries on, and then suddenly something happens and it breaks the line. I think my work is very much connected with what happens when the line is fractured. I think everybody, men and women, has passed those gaps, it’s part of life, you know, it’s part of being human. And I think my work’s very much connected with that gap. It raises questions and it stirs things. I sometimes think my work is about someone who’s a foreigner, too. Because when one is a foreigner one has to be completely alert all the time. If you are living somewhere else, it doesn’t matter how long you live there, it’s like being on a tight-rope all the time. But it’s quite nice, you know, because it makes one think all the time. It’s a big challenge to be a foreigner. It’s great, I think.
WF: Some of the unresolved issues in the work maybe correspond with the unresolved relationship with where you are living.
LN: I’m sure there is some kind of connection there. Not only with the place where you are, but with the place you come from. Because you left, you didn’t resolve things there either, so, in fact, you are at the middle. But I think it’s quite healthy to be like this, you know. For long, long time I’ve been living between two completely different cultures, you know; it’s being like an exile more or less. And I think there is a connection there, you know, I think so.


in http://www.tate.org.uk/britain/exhibitions/audioarts/cd3_ln_transcript.htm#




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Recently Í stumbled across a drawing of the late Lucia Nogueria, a Brazilian Artist who lived in London.
Although she is well known for her installations, her drawings give a lot of inside in how she approached art and the thought process behind her sculptures. Her drawings are strong enough though to stand alone and are not merely made as practical visualization of her installations.
This drawing, made with graphite and ink shows a fat black stroke starting at the upper edge of the drawing and falls down with a heavy gravitational pull. On the end of the stroke starts a thin spiral form.
It is as if the spiral winds the black fat stroke up, like the spiral of the inner mechanism of a watch.
Underneath the black stroke you can just see some thin lines which connects the spiral with the stroke.
It’s tight and you feel the energy that it contains. Unrole the spiral and it wil roll into it’s original position like a party horn.
The drawing has captured the energy and is keeping it forever, it never will be able to release the tension. Or maybe it does, the energy of the spiral is floating through the thin lines into the thick stroke out of the paper. But like a magic mark the spiral never runs out of energy.
The spiral is used in many a painting, never completely perfect. The sign is spotted in the oldest cave paintings and burial sites in Africa. It’s one of the signs often used in magical and shamanistic rites, like the circle and the triangle.
I do not know why Lucia Nogueria painted this drawing, but it is a drawing of simplicity and need. You know, the drawing is finished, it shows what it is. You can tell Lucia had an idea in her head, a form or general notion. This had to be visualized. The drawing is made out of necessity.

in  http://www.famousdrawings.org/lucia-nogueria-the-energy-of-a-spiral/

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in http://www.galerialeme.com/exposicoes_textos.php?lang=por&id=153&text_id=427



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Lucia Nogueira: drawings 27 May - 10 July 2005
At 'Drawing Room', London, UK


This exhibition presents a selection of around 40 drawings made by the influential Brazilian artist in the years between 1988 and her premature death in 1998. This will be the first exhibition dedicated to the artist's drawings and will offer an insight into the thinking process behind much of her work in three dimensions.




Lucia Nogueira, Drawing 1 1994
©The Estate of Lucia Nogueira, courtesy Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London


Drawing was an integral and essential part of Nogueira’s life and work. Often very beautiful and complete in themselves, the drawings also give an understanding of the origin and thinking behind her sculptural work, installations and films. Working intuitively, many of the drawings explore her interest in the intrinsic shape and transformative value of objects such as canisters, chairs, tables and ladders. In contrast is her range of intimate pencil and watercolour drawings based on childhood storybook characters like Pinocchio or Winnie the Pooh. In her sculpture, Nogueira most often worked with found, broken and abandoned objects, stripping them of their component parts, transforming them into highly poetic and disquieting works. A fragile balance between power and stability is frequently suggested through the use of dangerous and volatile materials such as gunpowder, bullets, broken glass and petrol.




Lucia Nogueira, Untitled
©The Estate of Lucia Nogueira, courtesy Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London


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Throughout the 1990’s, Nogueira’s reputation grew and she commanded much respect from a host of younger and established artists. This exhibition aims to begin a re-evaluation of the significance of this artist’s work, and the influence that she had and still has on many younger artists practicing today. It will affirm drawing’s crucial, cognitive role in the process of making work in three dimensions. It also commemorates Nogueira's connection with fellow artists of Tannery Arts studios.
Lucia Nogueira was born in Brazil in 1950, studied journalism in Brasilia and went on to study photography in the US. She came to London in 1975 to study fine art at Chelsea College of Art and Central School. Significant solo exhibitions include: Chisenhale Gallery, 1990; Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, 1993, Camden Arts Centre, 1994; Smoke, Berwick Ramparts Project, Berwick-on-Tweed, 1996. Group exhibitions include: Material Culture, Hayward Gallery, 1997 and the British Art Show 4, 1995,Promises Promises, Serpentine Gallery, 1989 Within the UK, the artist’s drawings, sculptures and films are in many public collections including Arts Council England, Leeds City Art Gallery and the Tate Gallery.
The catalogue will include twelve full colour illustrations and texts by Penelope Curtis, Curator, The Henry Moore Institute, Leeds and David Austen, artist. Price £8.
The catalogue has been supported by The Henry Moore Foundation and the exhibition by the Foyle Foundation.


25 May 18.30 Tacita Dean, Adrian Searle and Rachel Whiteread 'In Conversation'
about the work of Lucia Nogueira.
At The Drawing Room. Booking essential tel 020 7729 5333 or mail@drawingroom.org.uk




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FB page @:  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Lucia-Nogueira-artist/126368680749677


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